Exercise May Help Focus Attention for Those with ADHD

Previous studies have shown that exercise has a positive effect on attention for individuals with ADHD. Most of thees studies have focused on measuring improvement in attention following exercise.  A new study shows that attention is substantially improved during exercise. These results, if validated by additional studies, offer the prospect that incorporating exercise into tasks at school and work, can help improve an ADHD individual’s overall attention and cognitive performance.

Single Tasking – When Less is More

Multitasking, or rapidly switching your attention from one task to another and then back again, was once heralded as a necessary survival skill for our fast-paced world. But research has shown that multitasking doesn’t work for cognitively demanding tasks. For the ADHD brain – which craves stimulation and can become easily bored – multitasking is a temptation to be avoided, especially at work. Learning to be a “single-tasker” can make your daily living both more productive and less stressful.

Stimulation, Rewards and the ADHD Brain

Science is providing us with greater insight into the neurological factors that govern ADHD. If you have ADHD and want to make sense of your behaviors, it is important to understand the neurological differences in the ADHD brain that underlie those behaviors. Since ADHD behaviors are frequently mislabeled and misjudged by society, there is some comfort in knowing that there are neurological explanations for sometimes incomprehensible behaviors.

Can Video Games Be an Alternative Therapy for ADHD?

Findings from several recent studies suggest that certain aspects of ADHD can be improved with at-home computer interventions. This comes as welcome news to children, who adapt easily to mobile devices, and to parents who seek alternatives to drugs that have limited effectiveness and adverse effects. These studies provide encouraging evidence that video game technology might one day be used as part of an ADHD treatment regime.

How to Study Smarter When You Have ADHD in College

The transition to college can be difficult for students with ADHD. College is often the time where you need a new set of skills – or maybe just a tune up – to cope with ADHD. In your life before college, high school and your parents together gave you built‐in structure and accountability. But in college you have a lot of unstructured time and you are totally in charge of making all of your own decisions. Here are some strategies to help you study smarter and experience success in college.

Tips for Staying Focused When You Have Adult ADHD

If you are one of the roughly 10 million U.S. adults with ADHD, it can be a constant challenge to stay focused and on task. You might easily lose track of conversations or forget what you were working on. Or fail to pay attention to important details and make mistakes. But this isn’t an oversight on your part. An inability to focus is a prominent symptom of ADHD. Here are some strategies to help you maintain your attention and focus.

Music and ADHD Therapy

The interventions for ADHD that are most often discussed are medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, coaching, support groups, and/or changes in the home, work, or school environments. Other tools can include exercise, meditation, a healthy diet, and good sleep. One intervention that is not typically highlighted is music therapy. Research suggests that music could benefit someone with ADHD, by increasing dopamine levels) and thereby improving attention and executive functioning skills.

Tapping the Artistic Impulse – ADHD and Art Therapy

Children with ADHD and learning differences often struggle with intense emotions, poor social skills, and low self-esteem. Art therapy uses drawing, painting, and sculpting to improve well-being and confidence in kids. It is based on the premise that self-expression can be used to address emotional problems, develop interpersonal skills, manage behavior, reduce stress, and increase self-awareness.

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