Taming the Stress Monster When You Have ADHD

One of the keys to managing your ADHD symptoms is to identify your individual trigger points. Once you recognize what triggers your ADHD symptoms, you can make changes to your lifestyle that will help control episodes. For many adults with ADHD, stress is a particularly difficult trigger to deal with. In part this is due to the fact that ADHD itself may cause an ongoing state of stress. Here are some strategies to help you tame stress at home or work.

Tips for Staying Focused When You Have Adult ADHD

If you are one of the roughly 10 million U.S. adults with ADHD, it can be a constant challenge to stay focused and on task. You might easily lose track of conversations or forget what you were working on. Or fail to pay attention to important details and make mistakes. But this isn’t an oversight on your part. An inability to focus is a prominent symptom of ADHD. Here are some strategies to help you maintain your attention and focus.

Checking for Symptoms of Adult ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not just a problem in children; the symptoms can manifest at any age. If you were diagnosed with childhood ADHD, chances are, you’ve carried at least some of the symptoms into adulthood. But even if you were never diagnosed with ADHD as a child, that doesn’t mean you can’t be affected by it as an adult. You can learn to spot potential symptoms of adult ADHD and determine if you should talk to a healthcare professional about a possible diagnosis.

Tips for Curbing the ADHD Spending Impulse

Impulsive behavior can be a symptom of ADHD, and that includes impulse buying. This problem can be especially acute during the holidays when there are so many more temptations beckoning from stores and online shopping venues. If you have ADHD, there are a number of things you can do to help curb your impulse buying.

Planning for a Happy Holiday Season When You Have ADHD

The holidays should be a time to celebrate with friends and family, but all too often they can be a time of stress and unhappiness. For those with ADHD, the holidays can be both stimulating and overwhelming. There is shopping to do, parties and events to attend, and cards to write. Taking time to solve your holiday planning problems before they crop up will help you (and your loved ones) enjoy the season and start the new year energized, refreshed, and happy.

ADHD – The Gender Difference

As researchers discover more about ADHD, we are beginning to see that the disorder presents differently in boys and girls, and later, in adult men and women. Understanding these gender differences could help the medical community make earlier diagnoses of ADHD for girls and perhaps help forestall issues related to untreated ADHD later in life.

ADHD “Super Powers”

There has been plenty written about the “disorder” aspects of ADHD – problems with attention, focus, impulsivity and executive function skills in general. But research studies seem to confirm that there is another side to the condition. It can bring with it, under the right circumstances, an ability to perform at extraordinary levels.

Defeating the Clutter Monster When You Have ADHD

When you have adult ADHD, staying organized can be a continuing struggle. Despite your best efforts, yet you never seem to get any more organized. There are piles of papers and clutter all around. You still lose your keys on a regular basis and spend time every day looking for your cell phone. Here are some strategies that can help you keep the clutter at bay.

Diagnosing ADHD in Adulthood

posted in: Adults, For Coaches | 0

More adults in their 40s, 50s and 60s are being diagnosed with ADHD. They have experienced the symptoms of ADHD for years without understanding the cause. The understanding that comes from such a diagnosis can have positive, life changing effects. However, getting an ADHD diagnosis as an adult can be difficult because the normal aging process mimics some of the symptoms of the condition.

Strategies for Building a Stronger Relationship When You Have ADHD

The divorce rate is nearly twice as high for people with ADHD, (which affects roughly 4 percent of adults), as it is for other couples. The symptoms of the ADHD partner can result in misunderstandings that, left unresolved, can lead to trouble in a marriage. There are some basic strategies you can take to strengthen your relationship when ADHD is making it difficult.

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