Adult ADHD and Risk Taking

posted in: Adults, Mental Health | 0

Clinicians and researchers have long known that individuals with ADHD are more prone to engaging in risky behaviors such as smoking, gambling, substance abuse and unprotected sex. New studies show that adults with ADHD may engage in more risky behavior because of an exaggerated sense of benefit and a lessened ability to understand the consequences.

The Symptoms of High-Functioning Adult ADHD

Many adults can have ADHD without even realizing it. These individuals may have all the typical symptoms of ADHD, but found ways to cope with them and get through life without major issues. This is known as “high functioning” ADHD. Here are some of the symptoms that characterize adult, high functioning ADHD.

ADHD Through the Years

Many parents who have children with ADHD may wonder how the symptoms will change as their child gets older. Will they get worse, diminish, or just change into something different. Researchers have studied this question and come up with a kind of roadmap for how ADHD symptoms are likely to change, on average, with age.

Manage Your ADHD with a Little Help from Your Smartphone

Technology can be both a blessing and a curse, especially if you have ADHD. Tools like email and the Internet can be the source of huge distraction. But carefully choosing from the myriad of apps available today can help you move to a new level of productivity and really tap into your ADHD super powers. We offer you a sample of apps that you can use to organize every aspect of your life.

The Daily Groove: Learning to Love Routines When You Have ADHD

You have ADHD and your life seems chaotic and disorganized. You want to add more structure to your daily activities. You need to approach it carefully. Making changes that are too big or complicated, or tackling too much at one time generally won’t work. If you add structure in small steps, you won’t always get it 100 percent right, but you’ll probably be better off than you were before. We offer tips to help you create a daily routine that will give your life structure without being burdensome.

Taming the Stress Monster When You Have ADHD

One of the keys to managing your ADHD symptoms is to identify your individual trigger points. Once you recognize what triggers your ADHD symptoms, you can make changes to your lifestyle that will help control episodes. For many adults with ADHD, stress is a particularly difficult trigger to deal with. In part this is due to the fact that ADHD itself may cause an ongoing state of stress. Here are some strategies to help you tame stress at home or work.

Tips for Staying Focused When You Have Adult ADHD

If you are one of the roughly 10 million U.S. adults with ADHD, it can be a constant challenge to stay focused and on task. You might easily lose track of conversations or forget what you were working on. Or fail to pay attention to important details and make mistakes. But this isn’t an oversight on your part. An inability to focus is a prominent symptom of ADHD. Here are some strategies to help you maintain your attention and focus.

Checking for Symptoms of Adult ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not just a problem in children; the symptoms can manifest at any age. If you were diagnosed with childhood ADHD, chances are, you’ve carried at least some of the symptoms into adulthood. But even if you were never diagnosed with ADHD as a child, that doesn’t mean you can’t be affected by it as an adult. You can learn to spot potential symptoms of adult ADHD and determine if you should talk to a healthcare professional about a possible diagnosis.

Tips for Curbing the ADHD Spending Impulse

Impulsive behavior can be a symptom of ADHD, and that includes impulse buying. This problem can be especially acute during the holidays when there are so many more temptations beckoning from stores and online shopping venues. If you have ADHD, there are a number of things you can do to help curb your impulse buying.

Planning for a Happy Holiday Season When You Have ADHD

The holidays should be a time to celebrate with friends and family, but all too often they can be a time of stress and unhappiness. For those with ADHD, the holidays can be both stimulating and overwhelming. There is shopping to do, parties and events to attend, and cards to write. Taking time to solve your holiday planning problems before they crop up will help you (and your loved ones) enjoy the season and start the new year energized, refreshed, and happy.

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