Stimulation, Rewards and the ADHD Brain

posted in: Adults, Mental Health | 0

Science is providing us with greater insight into the neurological factors that govern ADHD. If you have ADHD and want to make sense of your behaviors, it is important to understand the neurological differences in the ADHD brain that underlie those behaviors. Since ADHD behaviors are frequently mislabeled and misjudged by society, there is some comfort in knowing that there are neurological explanations for sometimes incomprehensible behaviors.

ADHD “Super Powers”

There has been plenty written about the “disorder” aspects of ADHD – problems with attention, focus, impulsivity and executive function skills in general. But research studies seem to confirm that there is another side to the condition. It can bring with it, under the right circumstances, an ability to perform at extraordinary levels.

Highly Sensitive and ADHD

Often, people with ADHD are also highly sensitive to environmental stimuli. They may have a disproportionate reaction to sounds, smells, tactile sensations or certain visual stimuli. There are many benefits to high sensitivity, but the extra sensory load that accompanies this trait can be overwhelming if it is not understood and managed.