Could Childhood ADHD Be a Sleep Disorder?

Over the past several decades, educators, policymakers and scientists have referred to ADHD, as a national crisis and have spent billions of dollars looking into its cause. They’ve looked at genetics, brain development, exposure to toxic substances like lead, the push for early academics, and many other factors. But new studies have a number of researchers asking whether the behavior and attention issues ascribed to ADHD are due to the fact that many kids today simply don’t get the sleep they need.

ADHD – The Gender Difference

As researchers discover more about ADHD, we are beginning to see that the disorder presents differently in boys and girls, and later, in adult men and women. Understanding these gender differences could help the medical community make earlier diagnoses of ADHD for girls and perhaps help forestall issues related to untreated ADHD later in life.

ADHD “Super Powers”

There has been plenty written about the “disorder” aspects of ADHD – problems with attention, focus, impulsivity and executive function skills in general. But research studies seem to confirm that there is another side to the condition. It can bring with it, under the right circumstances, an ability to perform at extraordinary levels.

ADHD and Sound Stimulation: A Good Noise, Bad Noise Story

Individuals with ADHD often report being very sensitive to all sorts of stimuli in the environment, especially noise. They can experience large swings of over-stimulation followed by periods of emotional and physical depletion. Research is now beginning to uncover the source of this phenomenon and suggest how it can be controlled and harnessed for positive effect.

Diagnosing ADHD in Adulthood

posted in: Adults, For Coaches | 0

More adults in their 40s, 50s and 60s are being diagnosed with ADHD. They have experienced the symptoms of ADHD for years without understanding the cause. The understanding that comes from such a diagnosis can have positive, life changing effects. However, getting an ADHD diagnosis as an adult can be difficult because the normal aging process mimics some of the symptoms of the condition.