The Gap Year Advantage

A gap year is simply a break either before or during college. It is a time when students take a break from formal education to do activities like travel, volunteer, study, intern, work, perform or research. The increased maturity, self-confidence and life experience that a gap year can confer, especially for a student with ADHD, is well worth the investment if it means a better chance for your child to succeed in college and, later, in a career.

Matching Up with an ADHD Friendly College

The transition to college for students with ADHD can be stressful and the first year drop out rate can be high. That makes selecting the right college even more important. The college should not only provide accommodations and services to support those with ADHD, but should have a culture and structure that matches well to your symptoms and routines. Here are a number of important criteria to consider when selecting a college that is ADHD-friendly.

How to Study Smarter When You Have ADHD in College

The transition to college can be difficult for students with ADHD. College is often the time where you need a new set of skills – or maybe just a tune up – to cope with ADHD. In your life before college, high school and your parents together gave you built‐in structure and accountability. But in college you have a lot of unstructured time and you are totally in charge of making all of your own decisions. Here are some strategies to help you study smarter and experience success in college.

Strategies for Surviving the First Year of College with ADHD

Research indicates that college students with ADHD have a greater chance of failing and having to retake classes, getting lower grade point averages, and leaving college without graduating than students without ADHD. Despite the challenges, there are strategies that can help make the transition to college from high school easier and more successful.

A Gap Year – The Right Choice for an ADHD Teen?

A gap year is an experiential year typically taken between high school and college in order to deepen practical, professional, and personal awareness. A gap year can be especially important and beneficial for students with ADHD. Here are some things to consider if you are thinking about a gap year for your ADHD teen.

ADHD Success: It’s Not all About Grades

Many high school and college students have a lot of worry, anxiety and even depression because they aren’t sure what they want to do with their lives. ADHD can make those feelings even more acute. Recent research shows that when students look to external cues for a sense of self-worth can have negative consequences. An ADHD coach can help a high school or college student focus on their intentions and values as a source of self-esteem.

Dropping Out of College and ADHD

Have you ever been so far behind you considered dropping out? If you have ADHD, you aren’t alone. Students who have ADHD are much less likely to finish college than their peers. No one is keeping track of whether or not you come to class. It’s a time where you need solid skills in time management, organization and self discipline. Unfortunately, if you have fallen too far behind in your school work, you may not be able to avoid dropping out, but there are some important steps you can take right now to help get you through this difficult time.

What Makes a College ADHD friendly?

A lot of people find our site while searching for an ADHD-friendly college. Parents hope to find the perfect program to take their place when their son or daughter heads off to college. There are a host of factors that parents use to judge if a school is appropriate: cost, size and location. There are 5 other criteria you can use to determine if a college is a good fit.