Could Childhood ADHD Be a Sleep Disorder?

Over the past several decades, educators, policymakers and scientists have referred to ADHD, as a national crisis and have spent billions of dollars looking into its cause. They’ve looked at genetics, brain development, exposure to toxic substances like lead, the push for early academics, and many other factors. But new studies have a number of researchers asking whether the behavior and attention issues ascribed to ADHD are due to the fact that many kids today simply don’t get the sleep they need.

Getting Better Sleep with ADHD

Recent research has linked ADHD to a variety of sleep problems in children. There are a number of simple steps you can take to help your ADHD child create better sleep patterns. By working with your child and your child’s physician, you can create a sound sleep environment to help your child get the sleep they need to succeed with ADHD.

ADHD and Anxiety: non-drug treatments everyone can try

Common forms of anxiety are much more common in people who have ADHD than the general population. Half (52%) of adults with ADHD will experience general anxiety disorder during their lifetimes. There are a few easy, everyday things you can do that will help control anxiety without taking another pill. And you can start right now!

Ask the coach: I’m always late!

Being chronically late can be a problem when you have ADHD. Instead of focusing on getting your boss to understand why you are tardy, it’s more useful to consider ways to get yourself to work (and school) on time. You can do it! It just may take a little experimenting to find what works best for you.