Adult ADHD and Risk Taking

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Clinicians and researchers have long known that individuals with ADHD are more prone to engaging in risky behaviors such as smoking, gambling, substance abuse and unprotected sex. New studies show that adults with ADHD may engage in more risky behavior because of an exaggerated sense of benefit and a lessened ability to understand the consequences.

Jim Carrey – A Life in Color

Jim Carrey is a Canadian-American actor, comedian, impressionist, screenwriter, and producer, best known for.his highly energetic slapstick performances. By any measure, he has achieved fame and success in his acting career. In fact, his is an almost classic story of rising from near poverty to comparative wealth. Carrey’s story is an inspiring example of how the “gift of ADHD” – its super powers – can be used to achieve a more fulfilling and meaningful life.

How Exercise Helps You Cope with Adult ADHD

Most of us are aware of the benefits of exercise for our bodies. But it is also great for your brain. For individuals with ADHD, exercise can help them focus and leads to changes in the brain that are comparable to the effects of medications used to treat ADHD. The benefits are well worth the effort and can augment other forms of treatment for your ADHD symptoms.

The Symptoms of High-Functioning Adult ADHD

Many adults can have ADHD without even realizing it. These individuals may have all the typical symptoms of ADHD, but found ways to cope with them and get through life without major issues. This is known as “high functioning” ADHD. Here are some of the symptoms that characterize adult, high functioning ADHD.

ADHD Through the Years

Many parents who have children with ADHD may wonder how the symptoms will change as their child gets older. Will they get worse, diminish, or just change into something different. Researchers have studied this question and come up with a kind of roadmap for how ADHD symptoms are likely to change, on average, with age.

Manage Your ADHD with a Little Help from Your Smartphone

Technology can be both a blessing and a curse, especially if you have ADHD. Tools like email and the Internet can be the source of huge distraction. But carefully choosing from the myriad of apps available today can help you move to a new level of productivity and really tap into your ADHD super powers. We offer you a sample of apps that you can use to organize every aspect of your life.

Staying Safe Behind the Wheel When You Have ADHD

The symptoms of ADHD, which often include an inability to pay attention, distraction, and impaired impulse control can make driving more difficult. A number of studies have confirmed a higher number of car accidents among people with ADHD than the general population. While the cognitive demands of driving can be difficult for those with ADHD, especially teens there are a number of simple steps you can take to be a safe driver and avoid becoming dangerously distracted.

How to Study Smarter When You Have ADHD in College

The transition to college can be difficult for students with ADHD. College is often the time where you need a new set of skills – or maybe just a tune up – to cope with ADHD. In your life before college, high school and your parents together gave you built‐in structure and accountability. But in college you have a lot of unstructured time and you are totally in charge of making all of your own decisions. Here are some strategies to help you study smarter and experience success in college.

The Daily Groove: Learning to Love Routines When You Have ADHD

You have ADHD and your life seems chaotic and disorganized. You want to add more structure to your daily activities. You need to approach it carefully. Making changes that are too big or complicated, or tackling too much at one time generally won’t work. If you add structure in small steps, you won’t always get it 100 percent right, but you’ll probably be better off than you were before. We offer tips to help you create a daily routine that will give your life structure without being burdensome.

ADHD and Concussion

When it comes to the association of having ADHD and being at higher risk for concussion, researchers have begun to confirm what clinicians have long suspected. Due to various factors such as impulsivity, inattention, impairment in motor function, or differences in coordination, individuals with ADHD could be more likely to sustain a head injury. Their symptoms might also be more severe and persist for longer periods of time. Taking measures to reduce the symptoms of ADHD is one way to lower the risk of concussion for individuals with the condition.

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