The Hidden Costs of ADHD

Recent research conducted at Florida International University has estimated that on average, families of kids with ADHD spent $15,036 per child—not including medication or therapy—and families of kids without ADHD spent $2,848 over the course of a child’s development. The study aims to alert parents to the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to help reduce the impact on the family.

The ADHD Sibling Effect

Raising a child with ADHD usually requires a great deal of patience and understanding on the part of the parents. But for the siblings, having a brother or sister with ADHD can also be quite a challenge. Here are some tips to help the whole family manage potential difficulties and also have an opportunity to learn positive lessons about empathy, creativity, sharing, and more.

Instructions Not Included

While raising a son who has ADHD, Cynthia Flash often told people “He comes with an instruction manual. Unfortunately, it’s written in Chinese and I don’t speak Chinese.” So, when she read Penny Williams’ new book about parenting an ADHD son titled, “A Boy Without Instructions,” she naturally felt a strong resonance. In this review, she discusses Williams’ approach to parenting children with ADHD based on collaboration and empathy.

Determining a Family’s Stress When a Child has ADHD

Raising a child with ADHD can be stressful for parents and siblings. Providers have generally focused on the care of the child. Now, a tool called IMPACT 1.0 allows clinicians to assess the impact an ADHD child is having on the family’s quality of life. This will offer providers a tool to better connect with and support the families of children with ADHD, and help avoid parental burn-out.

Mindful Practice in ADHD Coaching

It’s not easy for parents managing kids with ADHD, jobs, after school activities and community obligations. Parents can feel overwhelmed and stressed by modern day parenting. The research shows that small doses of Mindful practice can be helpful in Executive Function challenges, mind wandering, and emotional regulation. It’s important to start with yourself. If you feel a bit less stressed and a bit more mindful, your children will be more likely to join with you in the journey to calm. Here are a few tips to help get you going.

Creating a Back to School Game Plan for Your ADHD Child

Going back to school can be a stressful time for children with ADHD, as well as for their families. The more relaxed environment of summer is replaced by arguments over homework, paying attention and following directions at school. It doesn’t have to be that way if you start the school year by discussing a plan with your child to help reduce the stress on everyone from the start. Here are some things to consider for your back to school game plan.

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