The ADHD Sibling Effect

Raising a child with ADHD usually requires a great deal of patience and understanding on the part of the parents. But for the siblings, having a brother or sister with ADHD can also be quite a challenge. Here are some tips to help the whole family manage potential difficulties and also have an opportunity to learn positive lessons about empathy, creativity, sharing, and more.

Instructions Not Included

While raising a son who has ADHD, Cynthia Flash often told people “He comes with an instruction manual. Unfortunately, it’s written in Chinese and I don’t speak Chinese.” So, when she read Penny Williams’ new book about parenting an ADHD son titled, “A Boy Without Instructions,” she naturally felt a strong resonance. In this review, she discusses Williams’ approach to parenting children with ADHD based on collaboration and empathy.

Determining a Family’s Stress When a Child has ADHD

Raising a child with ADHD can be stressful for parents and siblings. Providers have generally focused on the care of the child. Now, a tool called IMPACT 1.0 allows clinicians to assess the impact an ADHD child is having on the family’s quality of life. This will offer providers a tool to better connect with and support the families of children with ADHD, and help avoid parental burn-out.

Mindful Practice in ADHD Coaching

It’s not easy for parents managing kids with ADHD, jobs, after school activities and community obligations. Parents can feel overwhelmed and stressed by modern day parenting. The research shows that small doses of Mindful practice can be helpful in Executive Function challenges, mind wandering, and emotional regulation. It’s important to start with yourself. If you feel a bit less stressed and a bit more mindful, your children will be more likely to join with you in the journey to calm. Here are a few tips to help get you going.

Creating a Back to School Game Plan for Your ADHD Child

Going back to school can be a stressful time for children with ADHD, as well as for their families. The more relaxed environment of summer is replaced by arguments over homework, paying attention and following directions at school. It doesn’t have to be that way if you start the school year by discussing a plan with your child to help reduce the stress on everyone from the start. Here are some things to consider for your back to school game plan.

Training Parents of Young Children with ADHD Can Make a Difference

Preschool ADHD can have a substantial impact on the daily functioning of a child. It is generally predictive of executive function impairment through adolescence, despite treatment with medication. A recent collaborative study of 4 universities in the Netherlands and the U.K. has shown that training parents to do behavioral interventions at home can have a positive effect on a child’s ADHD symptoms and reduce stress within the family.

Getting Your ADHD Child a Pet

Many parents who have a child with ADHD may wonder if getting a pet is a good idea. Pets offer a child unconditional love and companionship, and having a pet can help teach kids a lot about responsibility and empathy. As a parent, you will need to assess whether your ADHD child can successfully handle a pet. It takes careful planning and understanding how a pet will fit in with your family’s situation.

When Both You and Your Child Have ADHD

Parents with ADHD that has not been diagnosed are often overwhelmed by the demands of parenting and struggling to meet their children’s needs. Lacking organizational skills, they may find keeping up with their kids’ schedules and managing their behavior very stressful. With the right treatment, parents who have ADHD themselves can be the best caregivers for their children with ADHD.

Back to School for Kids with ADHD

As the summer begins to wind down, parents start thinking about getting their kids ready to go back to school. For those parents with kids who have ADHD that can mean more extensive preparation. While kids with ADHD can have a difficult time adjusting to classrooms and homework again, there are steps you can take steps to help make the transition easier.

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