Training Parents of Young Children with ADHD Can Make a Difference

Preschool ADHD can have a substantial impact on the daily functioning of a child. It is generally predictive of executive function impairment through adolescence, despite treatment with medication. A recent collaborative study of 4 universities in the Netherlands and the U.K. has shown that training parents to do behavioral interventions at home can have a positive effect on a child’s ADHD symptoms and reduce stress within the family.

The Subtle Signature of ADHD in Adult Women

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Researchers are now beginning to understand that ADHD manifests differently in adult men and women. ADHD in women is often difficult to spot. For this reason, many women unnecessarily suffer the feelings of overwhelm, exhaustion, depression and inadequacy that come with ADHD. There are signs which may indicate whether a woman has the condition, and steps she can take to get a diagnosis and treatment to improve the quality of life.

Therapy Dogs – A New Treatment for Childhood ADHD?

A new research study, conducted at the University of California, Irvine, shows that therapy dogs may be effective in reducing the symptoms of ADHD in children. It offers families a viable option when seeking alternative or adjunct therapies to medication treatments for ADHD, especially when it comes to impaired attention and building social skills.

The Long Reach of Childhood Trauma

A study recently published in the journal Pediatrics, concludes that parents who experienced severe trauma and stress during their own childhood are more likely to see behavioral health problems in their children. This shows a generational link between behavioral health issues of parents and their children. The support of teachers, coaches or mentors may have a key role in building a child’s resilience and mitigating the negative effects of childhood trauma.

ADHD and the Neuroplastic Brain

Can a person with ADHD train their brain to improve? The answer to that question may lie with something known as neuroplasiticity. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to create or alter its neural networks – essentially rewire itself – in response to stimuli from the environment. Understanding how our brains can “rewire” to help us improve offers another tool for individuals with ADHD to help overcome its negative effects and leverage its super powers.

Adult ADHD and Risk Taking

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Clinicians and researchers have long known that individuals with ADHD are more prone to engaging in risky behaviors such as smoking, gambling, substance abuse and unprotected sex. New studies show that adults with ADHD may engage in more risky behavior because of an exaggerated sense of benefit and a lessened ability to understand the consequences.

The Symptoms of High-Functioning Adult ADHD

Many adults can have ADHD without even realizing it. These individuals may have all the typical symptoms of ADHD, but found ways to cope with them and get through life without major issues. This is known as “high functioning” ADHD. Here are some of the symptoms that characterize adult, high functioning ADHD.

ADHD and Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a condition where a child is almost always angry, frustrated and defiant toward authority figures. The exact causes of ODD are not known, but it occurs more frequently in families with a history of ADHD. There are many effective treatments for ODD, and strategies that parents can use to lessen the severity of symptoms and their negative impacts both within and outside the home.

ADHD Through the Years

Many parents who have children with ADHD may wonder how the symptoms will change as their child gets older. Will they get worse, diminish, or just change into something different. Researchers have studied this question and come up with a kind of roadmap for how ADHD symptoms are likely to change, on average, with age.

Can Video Games Be an Alternative Therapy for ADHD?

Findings from several recent studies suggest that certain aspects of ADHD can be improved with at-home computer interventions. This comes as welcome news to children, who adapt easily to mobile devices, and to parents who seek alternatives to drugs that have limited effectiveness and adverse effects. These studies provide encouraging evidence that video game technology might one day be used as part of an ADHD treatment regime.

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