Making the Most of ADHD Brain Training Apps

Individual with ADHD can struggle with cognitive issues. So-called “brain training” games or apps have been offered as one way for them to improve concentration, organization skills, and memory. Part of the key to success with these tools is knowing which ones work best for your situation, and how to use them to maximum advantage. Here are some tips for getting the most out of brain training apps.

Taking Control of Impulse Buying When You Have ADHD

The holiday season is here and the holiday marketing push has begun in earnest. We are all susceptible to spending more than we should during the holidays, but the impulsive, quick reacting nature of ADHD makes impulse buying all the more tempting. If you have ADHD and find yourself being pulled into a spending vortex, here are some tips that can help – not just during the holiday season, but throughout the year.

Avoiding the Internet Rabbit Hole When You Have ADHD

The internet has evolved into a wonderfully useful medium for learning new things, staying up on the news, shopping, and keeping in touch with friends on social media. For individuals with ADHD, it provides instant rewards, lots of stimulation, and an almost infinite variety of things to explore. But it can draw the ADHD brain into an endless rabbit hole where significant amounts of unproductive time is spent. Here are some tips you can use to help keep your Internet usage in check.

Tips for Conquering Clutter When You Have ADHD

Keeping your living space clutter-free can be a big issue if you have ADHD. It’s easy to become so overwhelmed that you don’t know where to begin to de-clutter. Here are some simple tips that you can use to de-clutter your living space and keep it organized so your environment won’t stress you out.

Creating a Back to School Game Plan for Your ADHD Child

Going back to school can be a stressful time for children with ADHD, as well as for their families. The more relaxed environment of summer is replaced by arguments over homework, paying attention and following directions at school. It doesn’t have to be that way if you start the school year by discussing a plan with your child to help reduce the stress on everyone from the start. Here are some things to consider for your back to school game plan.

Heading to College with ADHD

The transition from high school to college can be difficult if you have ADHD. There are more distractions, more to manage in the daily routine in terms of classes and social life, a more challenging academic environment, and less day-to-day support from parents. These factors can combine to make college a struggle and academic success less certain. Here are some things you can do to improve your odds of a successful start to college if you have ADHD.

Tips for Your ADHD Productivity Tune-up

When you have ADHD, getting things done can be a struggle. Keeping focused, maintaining motivation and avoiding distractions can all interfere with your productivity. Here are some tips to help you get organized, stay on task and get those important projects checked off your to-do list.

Getting Your ADHD Child a Pet

Many parents who have a child with ADHD may wonder if getting a pet is a good idea. Pets offer a child unconditional love and companionship, and having a pet can help teach kids a lot about responsibility and empathy. As a parent, you will need to assess whether your ADHD child can successfully handle a pet. It takes careful planning and understanding how a pet will fit in with your family’s situation.

How Exercise Helps You Cope with Adult ADHD

Most of us are aware of the benefits of exercise for our bodies. But it is also great for your brain. For individuals with ADHD, exercise can help them focus and leads to changes in the brain that are comparable to the effects of medications used to treat ADHD. The benefits are well worth the effort and can augment other forms of treatment for your ADHD symptoms.

The Gap Year Advantage

A gap year is simply a break either before or during college. It is a time when students take a break from formal education to do activities like travel, volunteer, study, intern, work, perform or research. The increased maturity, self-confidence and life experience that a gap year can confer, especially for a student with ADHD, is well worth the investment if it means a better chance for your child to succeed in college and, later, in a career.

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